David A. King

 

List of publications and works in press

 

September, 2011

Click for Printable PDF Version

 

 

Notes: Titles of books are printed bold; titles of reviews other than essay reviews are in small font. References of the form X-n indicate that an article has been reprinted as no. n in vol. X of the five Variorum volumes:

A           Islamic Mathematical Astronomy (1986/1993, see nos. 79/132)

B           Islamic Astronomical Instruments (1987/1995, see nos. 87/163)

C           Astronomy in the Service of Islam (1993, see no. 131)

D           Islamic Astronomy and Geography (to appear in 2012, see no. X5)

E           Astrolabes from Medieval Europe (2011, see no. 255)

Some other works are available in new versions in:

SATMI     Studies in Astronomical Timekeeping and Instrumentation in Medieval Islam (2004-05, see nos. 230-231)

Articles published in Suhayl are available on the Internet at www.ub.edu/arab/suhayl/.

Various articles are reprinted in New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, Muzaffar Iqbal, ed., 4 vols., Aldershot & Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2011.

The signs + and ++ indicate that the work in question was translated by Kurt Maier or the late Wolf-Dieter Wagner, respectively. An asterisk is used for further works not in English that were translated by others. X indicates a work in press, Y a work still in preparation.

 

1972

  1. The Astronomical Works of Ibn Yûnus, Ph.D. dissertation, Yale University, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Literatures, 1972. [Available from ProQuest.com (formerly University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Mich.), no. 7229740.]
  2. “The cAbd al-A’imma astrolabe forgeries” (with Owen Gingerich & George Saliba), Journal for the History of Astronomy 3 (1972), pp. 188-198. [Repr. in B-VI.]

1973

  1. “al-Khalîlî’s auxiliary tables for solving problems of spherical astronomy”, Journal for the History of Astronomy 4 (1973), pp. 99-110. [Repr. in A-XI; see now SATMI, I-II.]
  2. “Ibn Yûnus’ Very Useful Tables for reckoning time by the sun”, Archive for History of Exact Science 10 (1973), pp. 342-394. [Repr. in A-IX; see now SATMI, I-II.]
  3. A review of Bernard R. Goldstein, al-Bitrûjî: On the Principles of Astronomy, New Haven, Conn., & London, 1971, in Journal of the American Oriental Soci­ety 93 (1973), pp. 566-567.
  4. A review of Ahmed Saidan, Arabic Arithmetic: The Arithmetic of Abû al-Wafâ’ al-Bûzajânî [in Arabic], Amman, n.d. [1972?], in ISIS 64 (1973), pp. 123-125.

1974

  1. “A double-argument table for the lunar equation attributed to Ibn Yûnus”, Centaurus 18 (1974), pp. 129-146. [Repr. in A-V.]
  2. “On medieval Islamic multiplication tables”, Historia Mathematica 1 (1974), pp. 317-323. [Repr. in A-XIV; see also no. 32$.]
  3. “Smithsonian Institution Project in Medieval Islamic Astronomy”, Historia Mathematica 1 (1974), pp. 183-184.
  4. “An analog computer for solving problems of spherical astronomy: The shakkâzîya quadrant of Jamâl al-Dîn al-Mâridînî”, Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Sciences 24 (1974), pp. 219-242. [Repr. in B-X.]
  5. A review of Edward S. Kennedy & David Pingree, The Astrological History of Mâshâ’allâh, Cambridge, Mass., 1971, in Journal of Near Eastern Studies 33 (1974), pp. 158-160.
  6. A review of Edward S. Kennedy, A Commentary upon al-Bîrûnî’s Tahdîd [nihâyât] al-amâkin, Beirut, 1973, in Centaurus 19 (1974), pp. 320-323.

1975

  1. “al-Khalîlî’s qibla table”, Journal of Near Eastern Studies 34 (1975), pp. 81-122. [Repr. in A-XIII.]
  2. “On the astronomical tables of the Islamic Middle Ages”, Studia Copernicana 13 (1975), pp. 37-56. [Repr. in A-II.]
  3. “Astronomical timekeeping (cilm al-mîqât) in medieval Islam”, Actes du XXIXe Congrès International des Orientalistes, Paris: L’Asiathèque, 1975, II:2, pp. 86-90.
  4. “Ibn al-Shâtir” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, vol. XII, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1975, pp. 357-364.
  5. “Medieval mechanical devices”, an essay review of Donald R. Hill, The Book of Knowledge of Ingenious Mechanical Devices, Dordrecht & Boston, Mass., 1974, History of Science 13 (1975), pp. 284-289. [Repr. in B-XX.]

1976

  1. “Ibn Yûnus” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, vol. XIV, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1976, pp. 574-580.
  2. A review of Saleh Ahmed & Rushdi Rashed, Al-Bahir en algèbre d'as-Samaw’al, Damascus, 1972, in ISIS 67 (1976), pp. 307-308.

1977

  1. “A fourteenth-century Tunisian sundial for regulating the times of Muslim prayer”, in Walter G. Saltzer & Yasukatsu Maeyama, eds., PRISMATA: Natur­wissenschafts­geschicht­liche StudienFest­schrift für Willy Hartner, Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1977, pp. 187-202. [Repr. in B-XVIII; see now SATMI, IV.]
  2. “Ibn al-Shâtir’s Sandûq al-yawâqît: An astronomical com­pen­dium” (with Louis Janin), Journal for the History of Arabic Science 1 (1977), pp. 187-256. [Repr. in B-XII.]
  3. A review of Bernard R. Goldstein, The Astronomical Tables of Levi ben Gerson, Hamden, Conn., 1974, in ISIS 68 (1977), pp. 476-477.
  4. A review of Donald R. Hill, On the Construction of Water-Clocks; Kitab Arshimidas fi camal al-binkamat, London, 1976, in History of Science 15 (1977), pp. 295-298. [Repr. in B-XXI.]

1978

  1. “Astronomical timekeeping in fourteenth-century Syria”, Pro­ceedings of the First International Symposium for the History of Arabic Science (Aleppo, 1976), 2 vols., Aleppo: Institute for the History of Arabic Science, 1978, I, pp. 391-415 (Arabic), and II, pp. 75-84 (English). [Repr. in A-X; see now SATMI, I-II.]
  2. Project in Medieval Islamic AstronomyA Progress Report with Bib­liog­raphy, Cairo: American Research Center in Egypt (Project Re­port No. 1), Jan. 1978.
  3. “Three sundials from Islamic Andalusia”, Journal for the His­tory of Arabic Science 2 (1978), pp. 358-392. [Repr. in B-XV.]
  4. “Notes on the astrolabist Nastûlus/Bastûlus”, Archives Interna­tionales d’His­toire des Sciences 28 (1978), pp. 115-118. [Repr. in B-IV; see also no. 63$.]
  5. “Le cadran solaire de la mosquée d’Ibn Tûlûn au Caire” (with Louis Janin), Journal for the History of Arabic Science 2 (1978), pp. 331-357. [Repr. in B-XVI.]
  6. “al-Khalîlî” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, vol. XV, Supp. I, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1978, pp. 259-261.
  7. a: “Islamic mathematics and astronomy”, an essay review of the chapters on astronomy and mathemat­ics in Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Islamic Science: An Illustrated Study, London, 1976, in Journal for the History of Astronomy 9 (1978), pp. 212-219, b: repr. in Biblio­theca Orientalis 35 (1978), pp. 339-343. [The latter version is repr. in A-XVII.]

1979

  1. “Report on a field-trip to India, September-October, 1978”, News­letter of the American Research Center in Egypt, no. 108 (Spring, 1979), pp. 21-24.
  2. “Supplementary notes on medieval Islamic multiplication tables”, His­toria Mathematica 6 (1979), pp. 405-417. [A supplement to no. 8$; repr. in A-XV.]
  3. “On the early history of the universal astrolabe in Islamic astron­omy and the origin of the term shakkâzîya in medieval scientific Arabic”, Journal for the History of Arabic Science 3 (1979), pp. 244-257. [Repr. in B-VII.]
  4. “Ibn Yûnus and the pendulum: A history of errors”, Archives Inter­na­tio­nales d’Histoire des Sciences 29 (1979), pp. 35-52. [Repr. in B-XIX (abridged).]
  5. “Mathematical astronomy in medieval Yemen”, Arabian Studies 5 (1979), pp. 61-65. [Repr. in A-IV; see no. 58$.]
  6. “Astronomical timekeeping in Ottoman Turkey”, Proceedings of the Inter­national Symposium on the Observatories in Islam, 19-23 Sept., 1977, Istanbul: Millî Egitim Basımevi, 1980, pp. 245-269. [Repr. in A-XII.]
  7. “A classification of Islamic astronomical literature and the pre­sent state of research on the manuscript sources”, Proceedings of the Inter­national Sympo­sium on the Observatories in Islam, 19-23 Sept., 1977, Istan­bul: Millî Egitim Basımevi, 1980, pp. 169-180.
  8. “The sundial on the West Wall of the Madrasa of Sultan Qaytbay in Jerusalem” (with Archibald G. Walls), art and architec­ture research papers 15 (July, 1979), pp. 16-21. [Repr. in B-XVII.]
  9. “Kibla. ii. Astronomical aspects” [sacred direction], in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. V, fascs. 79-80, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1979, pp. 83-88. Repr. in C-IX.]
  10. “On the sources for the study of early Islamic mathematics”, an essay review of Fuat Sezgin, Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums, V: Mathematik, Lei­den: E. J. Brill, 1974, in Journal of the American Oriental Society 99 (1979), pp. 450-459.
  11. A review of Ali Abdallah Daffa, The Muslim Contribution to Mathematics, London & Atlantic High­lands, N.J., 1977, in History of Science 17 (1979), pp. 295-296. [Repr. in A-XVIII.]
  12. A review of William Brice, Colin Imber & Richard Lorch, The Dâ’ire-yi Mu’addel of Seydî Alî Re’îs, Manchester, 1976, in Journal for the History of Astronomy 10 (1979), pp. 51-53. [Repr. in B-XIII.]

1980

  1. “New light on the Zîj al-safâ’ih of Abû Jacfar al-Khâzin”, Centaurus 23 (1980), pp. 105-117. [Repr. in B-XI.]
  2. “The exact sciences in medieval Islam: Some remarks on the present state of research”, Bulletin of the Middle East Studies Associ­a­tion of North America 4 (1980), pp. 10-26. [Repr. in A-I (abridged).]
  3. “A handlist of the Arabic and Persian astronomical manuscripts in the Maha­raja Mansingh II Library in Jaipur”, Journal for the His­tory of Arabic Science 4 (1980), pp. 81-86. [Repr. in A-XVI.]
  4. “Ibn al-Majdî’s tables for calculating ephemerides” (with E. S. Kennedy), Journal for the History of Arabic Science 4 (1980), pp. 48-68. [Repr. in A-VI.]

1981

  1. A Catalogue of the Scientific Manuscripts in the Egyptian National Library [in Arabic], vol. 1: A criti­cal handlist of the scientific col­lec­tionsIndexes of copy­ists and owners, Cairo: General Egyptian Book Organization, 1981. [See nos. 77$ and 78$.]
  2. “On the origin of the astrolabe according to the medieval Ara­bic sources”, Journal for the History of Arabic Science 5 (1981), pp. 43-83. [Repr. in B-III and republished in SATMI, XIIIe.]
  3. “Early Islamic astronomy”, an essay review of Fuat Sezgin, Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums, VI: Astronomie, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1978, in Journal for the His­tory of Astronomy 12 (1981), pp. 55-59.
  4. A review of Kenneth Brecher & Michael Feirtag, eds., Astronomy of the Ancients, Cambridge, Mass., 1979, in Technology and Culture 22 (1981), pp. 300-301.

1982

  1. “On the astronomical orientation of the Kaaba” (with Gerald S. Haw­kins), Journal for the History of Astronomy 13 (1982), pp. 102-109. [Repr. in C-XII.]
  2. “Some astronomical observations from thirteenth-century Egypt” (with Owen Gingerich), Journal for the History of As­tron­omy 13 (1982), pp. 121-128. [Repr. in A-VII.]
  3. “Astronomical alignments in medieval Islamic religious archi­tec­ture”, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 385 (1982), pp. 303-312. [Repr. in C-XIII.]
  4. “Faces of the Kaaba”, The Sciences (The New York Academy of Sciences) 22:5 (May/June, 1982), pp. 16-20, and 22:6 (September, 1982), p. 2.
  5. “Willy Hartner, Ibn Yûnus and the meridian degree”, Centaurus 26 (1982), pp. 218-219.
  6. “Indian astronomy in fourteenth-century Fez: The versified Zîj of al-Qusuntînî” (with E. S. Kennedy), Journal for the His­tory of Ara­bic Science 6 (1982), pp. 3-45. [Repr. in A-VIII.]
  7. A review of Emilie Savage-Smith & M. B. Smith, Islamic Geomancy and a Thir­teenth-Century Divina­tory Device, Malibu, Ca.: Undena, 1980, in Archaeoastron­omyThe Bulletin of the Center for Archaeo­astronomy (College Park, Md.) 5 (1982), pp. 42-43. [Repr. in B-XXII.]

1983

  1. Mathematical Astronomy in Medieval YemenA Bio-Biblio­graphi­cal Survey, (Publications of the American Re­search Cen­ter in Egypt), Malibu, Ca.: Undena, 1983, xiii+98 pp. and 10 pls.
  2. E. S. Kennedy, Colleagues and Former Students, Studies in the Islamic Exact Sciences, Beirut: American University of Beirut, 1983 (co-editor with Mary Helen Kennedy).
  3. “A report on the Azhar Manuscript Library”, Newsletter of the Ameri­can Research Center in Egypt, no. 122 (Summer, 1983), pp. 41-50.
  4. “The astronomy of the Mamluks”, ISIS 74 (1983), pp. 531-555. [Repr. in A-III and New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, III.]
  5. “al-Khwârizmî and new trends in mathematical astronomy in the ninth century”, Occasional Papers on the Near East (New York Uni­versity, Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies) 2 (1983).
  6. “Nastûlus the astrolabist once again” (with Paul Kunitzsch), Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Sciences 33 (1983), pp. 342-343. [Repr. in B-V; see also no. 27$.]
  7. “Mathematical astronomy in medieval Yemen”, in R. B. Serjeant & Ronald Lewcock, eds., Sancâ’: An Arabian Islamic City, Lon­don: World of Islam Festi­val Trust, 1983, pp. 34-35.
  8. “Al-Bazdawî on the qibla in early Islamic Transoxania”, Journal for the History of Arabic Science 7 (1983/1986), pp. 3-38. [Repr. in D-IX.]
  9. A review of Heinrich Suter, Die Mathematiker und Astronomen der Araber und ihre Werke, Amster­dam: Oriental Press, 1982 reprint, in Journal for the History of Astronomy 14 (1983), pp. 62-63.

1984

  1. “The astronomy of the Mamluks: A brief overview”, Muqarnas 2 (1984), pp. 73-84.
  2. “Architecture and astronomy: The ventilators of medieval Cairo and their secrets”, Journal of the American Oriental Society 104 (1984), pp. 97-133. [A revised version is in SATMI, VIIb.]

1985

  1. “Five minor works of al-Khwârizmî” [in Russian], Proceed­ings of the Inter­national Conference on Khorezmi, Tashkent and Ur­gench, 1983, Tashkent, 1985, pp. 91-95.
  2. “The sacred direction in Islam: A Study of the Interaction of Reli­gion and Science in the Middle Ages”, Interdisciplinary Science Re­views 10:4 (1985), pp. 315-328.
  3. “Osmanische astronomische Handschriften und Instrumente”, in Türkische Kunst und Kul­tur aus os­manischer Zeit, 2 vols., Recklinghausen: Aurel Bongers, 1985, II, pp. 373-378. [Repr. in B-XIV.]
  4. “Astronomy for landlubbers and navigators: The case of the Islamic Middle Ages”, Revista da Universidade de Coimbra 32 (1985), pp. 211-223.
  5. “The medieval Yemeni astrolabe in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York”, Zeitschrift für Geschichte der arabisch-isla­mi­schen Wis­sen­schaften 2 (1985), pp. 99-122, and 4 (1987/88), pp. 268-269 (corrections). [Repr. in B-II and republished in SATMI, XIVa.]
  6. A review of Paul Kunitzsch, Glossar der arabischen Fachausdrücke in der mittelalter­lichen eu­ropäischen Fachliteratur, Göttingen, 1983, in ISIS 76 (1985), p. 435.
  7. A review of Ahmad Saeed Khan, A Bibliography of the Works of Abu’l-Raihan al-Biruni, New Delhi, 1982, in Ghanita-Bhâratî 7 (1985), pp. 43-44.
  8. A review of Ali Abdallah Al-Daffa & John S. Stroyls, Studies in the Exact Sciences in Medieval Islam, New York, N.Y., 1984, in Bulletin of the Middle East Association of North America 19 (1985), pp. 243-245. [Reviewed for Islamicistssee also no. 85$.]

1986

  1. A Catalogue of the Scientific Manuscripts in the Egyptian National Library [in Arabic], vol. 2: Descrip­tive cata­logue arranged chronologically according to subjectsIndex­es of authors and titles, Cairo: General Egyptian Book Organization, 1986. [See no. 47$.]
  2. A Survey of the Scientific Manuscripts in the Egyp­tian Na­tion­al Library, (Publications of the American Re­search Center in Egypt), Winona Lake, Ind.: Eisenbrauns, 1986, 331 pp. [Based on nos. 47$ and 77$, and arranged as a supplement to the standard bio-bibliographical literature. See no. 242$ for an index.]
  3. [A] Islamic Mathematical Astronomy, London: Variorum, 1986. Contents:

I           Some reflections on the history of Islamic astronomy;
II          On the astronomical tables of the Islamic Middle Ages (no. 14);
III         The astronomy of the Mamluks (no. 61);
IV        Mathematical astronomy in medieval Yemen (no. 35);
V         A double-argument table for the lunar equation attributed to Ibn Yûnus (no. 7);
VI        Ibn al-Majdî’s tables for calculating ephemerides (no. 46);
VII       Some astronomical observations from thirteenth-century Egypt (no. 52);
VIII      Indian astronomy in fourteenth-century Fez: The versified Zîj of al-Qusuntînî (no. 56);
IX        Ibn Yûnus` Very Useful Tables for reckoning time by the sun (no. 4);
X         Astronomical timekeeping in fourteenth-century Syria (no. 24);
XI        al-Khalîlî’s auxiliary tables for solving problems of spherical astronomy (no. 3);
XII       Astronomical timekeeping in Ottoman Turkey (no. 36);
XIII      al-Khalîlî’s qibla table (no. 13);
XIV      On medieval Islamic multiplication tables (no. 8);
XV       Supplementary notes on medieval Islamic multiplication tables (no. 32);
XVI      A handlist of the Arabic and Persian astronomical manuscripts in the Maharaja Mansingh II Library in Jaipur (no. 45);
XVII     Islamic mathematics and astronomy. An essay review of the chapters on mathematics and astronomy in S. H. Nasr, Islamic Science: An Illustrated Study (no. 30);
XVIII    Islamic mathematics. A review of A. A. Daffa, The Muslim Contribution to Mathematics (no. 41);
Addenda and corrigenda; indexes

[See no. 132$ for the 2nd edn.]

            Reviews:

            Sonja Brentjes in Historia Mathematica 16 (1989), p. 295.

            Jan Hogendijk in Mathematical Reviews (1989), no. 89e:01053.

            F. Jamil Ragep in Nuncius – Annali di Storia della Scienza 6 (1991), pp. 211-213.

  1. From Deferent to Equant: Studies in the History of Science in the Ancient and Medieval Near East in Honor of E. S. Kennedy (co-editor with George Saliba), Annals of the New York Academy of Sci­ences (500), 1986.
  2. “Some early Islamic tables for determining lunar crescent visibility”, in D. A. King & George Saliba, eds., From Deferent to Equant: Studies in the History of Science in the Ancient and Medieval Near East in Honor of E. S. Kennedy, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 500 (1986), pp. 185-225. [Repr. in C-II.]
  3. “Some Ottoman schemes of sacred geography”, Proceedings of the II. International Symposium on the History of Turkish and Islamic Science and Technology, Istanbul, 1986, 2 vols., Istan­bul: Istan­bul Technical Uni­versity, 1986, I, pp. 45-57.
  4. “The earliest Islamic mathematical methods and tables for find­ing the direc­tion of Mecca”, Zeitschrift für Geschichte der ara­bisch-is­lami­schen Wis­sen­schaften 3 (1986), pp. 82-149. with cor­rec­tions listed ibid. 4 (1987/88), p. 270. [Repr. in C-XIV.]
  5. A review of Galina P. Matvievskaya & Boris A. Rosenfeld, Mathematicians and Astronomers of the Islamic Middle Ages (VIII-XVII Centuries) and their Works [in Russian], in Historia Mathe­matica 13 (1986), pp. 306-308.
  6. A review of Ali Abdallah Al-Daffa & John S. Stroyls, Studies in the Exact Sciences in Medieval Islam, New York, N.Y., 1984, in Historia Mathematica 13 (1986), pp. 303-306. [Reviewed for histo­rians of mathematicssee also no. 76.]
  7. A review of Sharon Gibbs & George Saliba, Planispheric Astrolabes from the National Museum of Ameri­can History, Washington, D.C., 1984, in ISIS 77 (1986), pp. 711-713.

1987

  1. [B] Islamic Astronomical Instruments, London: Variorum, 1987. [See no. 163$ for a reprint.]

I           Astronomical instrumentation in the medieval Near East;
II          The medieval Yemeni astrolabe in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (no. 73);
III         The origin of the astrolabe according to the medieval Islamic sources (no. 48);
IV        A note on the astrolabist Nastûlus/Bastûlus (no. 27);
V         Nastûlus the astrolabist once again (no. 63);
VI        The cAbd al-A’imma astrolabe forgeries (no. 2);
VII       On the early history of the universal astrolabe in Islamic astronomy and the origin of the term shakkâzîya in medieval scientific Arabic (no. 33);
VIII      The astrolabe of cAlî al-Wadâcî;
IX        The astronomical instruments of Ibn al-Sarrâj: A brief survey;
X         An analog computer for solving problems of spherical astronomy: The shakkâzîya quadrant of Jamâl al-Dîn al-Mâridînî (no. 10);
XI        New light on the Zîj al-safâ‘ih of Abû Jacfar al-Khâzin (no. 43);
XII       Ibn al-Shâtir’s Sandûq al-yawâqît: An astronomical compendium (no. 21);
XIII      An Islamic astronomical instrument: A review of W. Brice, C. Imber & R. Lorch, The Dâ’ire-yi Mu’addel of Seydî cAlî Re’îs (no. 42);
XIV      Osmanische astronomische Handschriften und Instrumente (no. 71);
XV       Three sundials from Andalusia (no. 26);
XVI      Le cadran solaire de la mosquée d’Ibn Tûlûn au Caire (no. 28);
XVII     The sundial on the West Wall of the Madrasa of Sultan Qaytbay in Jerusalem (no. 38);
XVIII    A fourteenth-century Tunisian sundial for regulating the times of Muslim prayer (no. 20);
XIX      Ibn Yûnus and the pendulum: A history of errors (extract of no. 34);
XX       Medieval mechanical devices: A review of D. R. Hill, The Book of Knowledge of Ingenious Mechanical Devices (no. 17);
XXI      On Arabic water-clocks: A review of D. R. Hill, On the Construction of Water-Clocks (no. 23);
XXII     Islamic geomancy – A review of E. Savage-Smith & M. B. Smith, Islamic Geomancy and a Thirteenth-Century Divinatory Device (no. 57)
Addenda and corrigenda; indexes

            Reviews:

            E. S. Kennedy in Annals of Science 45 (1988), pp. 544-545.

            Sharon Gibbs Thibodeau in ISIS 81 (1990), pp. 101-102.

  1. “The astrolabe of cAlî al-Wadâcî” (previously unpublished), in B-VIII.
  2. “The astronomical instruments of Ibn al-Sarrâj” (previously un­published), in B-IX. [See SATMI, XIVb-5.1 for a more detailed description.]
  3. “Science in medieval Syria”, in Harvey Weiss, ed., Ebla to Damascus: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Syria, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, 1985, pp. 497-507.
  4. “Universal solutions in Islamic astronomy”, in J. Lennart Berggren & Bernard R. Gold­stein, eds., From Ancient Omens to Sta­tistical Mechanics: Essays on the Exact Sciences Pre­sented to Asger Aaboe, Acta Historica Scientiarum Naturalium et Medicinalium (Copenhagen) 39 (1987), pp. 121-132. [Repr. in C-VI; a revised version is in SATMI, VIa.]
  5. *  “Astronomie im mittelalterlichen Yemen”, in Werner Daum, ed., Jemen, Innsbruck: Pinguin & Frankfurt am Main: Um­schau, 1987, pp. 276-281 and 297-302. [See no. 106$ for the origi­nal.]
  6. “Makka. iv. As centre of the world” [sacred geography], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VI, fascs. 101-102, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1987, pp. 180-187. [Repr. in C-X.]
  7. A review of Edward S. Kennedy, David Pingree & Fuad Haddad, The Book of Reasons behind Astro­no­mi­cal Tables (Kitâb cilal al-zîjât) by cAlî ibn Sulaymân al-Hâshimî, in Journal for the History of Astronomy 18 (1987), pp. 284-286.
  8. A review of Ziva Vesel, Les encyclopédies persanes: Essai de typologie et de classification des sciences, Paris, 1986, in Bulletin of the Middle East Studies Asso­cia­tion of North America 21 (1987), pp. 115-116.

1988

  1. “Universal solutions to problems of spherical astronomy from Mamluk Egypt and Syria”, in Farhad Kazemi & Robert B. McChesney, eds., A Way Prepared: Essays on Islamic Culture in Honor of Richard Bayly Winder, New York: New York University Press, 1988, pp. 153-184, repr in C-VII. [A revised version is in SATMI, VIb.]
  2. “A medieval account of algebra before al-Khwârizmî”, al-Masâq: Studia Arabo-Islamica Mediterranea 1 (1988), pp. 25-32.
  3. “Ibn Yûnus on lunar crescent visibility”, Journal for the History of Astronomy 19 (1988), pp. 155-168. [Repr. in C-III.]
  4. A review of Charles Pellat, Cinq calendriers égyptiens, Cairo, 1986, in Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 25 (1988), pp. 252-253.

1989

  1. “Some Arabic copies of Vettius Valens’ table for calculating the duration of life”, in Gerhard Endress, ed., Symposium Graeco-Arabicum II, Amster­dam: B. R. Grüner, 1989, pp. 25-28. [See now no. 224$.]
  2. “al-Marrâkushî”, The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VI, fascs. 107-108, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1989, p. 598.
  3. “Matlac” [rising-points], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VI, fascs. 111-112, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1989, pp. 839-840. [Repr. in C-XI.]
  4. “Matâlic” [ascensions], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VI, fascs. 111-112, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1989, pp. 792-794.
  5. A review of Anton H. Heinen, Islamic Cosmology: A Study of as-Suyûtî’s al-Hay’a al-sanîya fi-l-hay’a al-sunnîya, Beirut, 1982, in Journal of the American Ori­en­tal Society 109 (1989), pp. 124-127.

1990

  1. “An overview of the sources for the history of astronomy in the me­dieval Maghrib”, Actes du 2e Colloque Maghrébin de l’His­toire des Mathéma­tiques Arabes, Tunis, 1-3 Dec. 1988, Tunis: Institut supérieur de l’Éducation et de la For­mation con­tinue, n.d. [ca. 1990], pp. 125-157. [See no. 196$ for a revised, expanded version.]
  2. “Astronomy in medieval Yemen”, in Werner Daum, ed., Yemen3000 Years of Art and Civilization in Arabia Felix, Inns­bruck: Pinguin & Frankfurt/Main: Umschau, n.d. [ca. 1990], pp. 300-308. [See also no. 92$.]
  3. “Astronomy” in M. J. L. Young, J. D. Latham & R. B. Serjeant, eds., Religion, Learning and Science in the ‘Abbasid Period, (a volume of the Cam­bridge History of Arabic Literature), Cam­bridge, etc.: Cambridge University Press, 1990, pp. 274-289. [Submitted in 1975!]
  4. “Die Sterne weisen nach Mekka – Arabische Astronomie im Dienste des Islam”, in Uwe Schultz, ed., Scheibe, Kugel, Schwar­zes LochDie wis­senschaftliche Eroberung des Kosmos, Munich: C. H. Beck, 1990, pp. 104-117. [Reprinted as a paperback Frankfurt am Main & Leipzig: Insel Verlag, 1996.]
  5. “A survey of medieval Islamic shadow schemes for simple timereckoning”, Oriens 32 (1990), pp. 191-249. [A new version is in SATMI, III.]
  6. “Between Europe and China: aspects of the astronomical tradi­tions of the lands of Islam”, in Isaia Iannaccone & Adolfo Tam­burello, eds., Dall’Europa alla Cina: contributi per una storia dell’­astronomia, Naples: Istituto Universi­tario Orientale, 1990, pp. 55-66.
  7. “Mayl” [declination], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VI, fascs. 113-114, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1990, pp. 914-915.
  8. “Mîkât. ii. Astronomical aspects” [time-keeping], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VII, fascs. 115-116, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1990, pp. 27-32. [Repr. in C-V.]
  9. A review of Emilie Savage-Smith, Islamicate Celestial Globes: Their History, Construction and Use, Wash­ington, D.C., 1985, in ISIS 81 (1990), pp. 762-764.

1991

  1. “Lunar crescent visibility predictions in medieval Islamic epheme­rides”, in S. Seikaly, R. Baalbaki, P. Dodd, eds., Quest for Under­standingArabic and Islamic Studies in Memory of Mal­colm H. Kerr, Beirut: American Uni­versity of Beirut, 1991, pp. 233-251. [Repr. in C-IV.]
  2. “Medieval astronomical instruments: A catalogue in prepara­tion”, Bul­letin of the Scientific Instrument Society 31 (Dec., 1991), pp. 3-7.
  3. *  “Strumentazione astronomica nel mondo medievale islamico”, in Gerard L’E. Turner, ed., Gli strumenti, Turin: Giulio Einaudi, 1991, pp. 154-189 and 581-585. [See no. 125$ for a sum­mary and SATMI, X for a revised version of the original English text.]
  4. “Science in the service of religion: The case of Islam”, impact of science on society (UNESCO), no. 159 (1991), pp. 245-262. [Repr. in C-I; also pub­lished in French, Por­tuguese, Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Korean. See nos. 143$ and 164$ for German and Italian versions, respectively.]
  5. “[Yemeni astrolabe, dated 1291]”, in Richard Ettinghausen et al., Islamische KunstMeisterwerke aus dem Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York [in German and English], Berlin: Staat­liche Museen Preußischer Kulturbesitz, 1981, pp. 146-147.
  6. “Mizwala” [sundial], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VII, fascs. 117-118, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1991, pp. 210-211. [Repr. in C-VIII.]
  7. A review of Mohammed Ilyas, Astronomy of Islamic Times for the Twenty-First Cen­tury, London & New York, 1988, in ISIS 82 (1991), pp. 348-349.
  8. A review of David Pin­gree, The Astronomical Works of Gregory Chioniades, I: The Zîj al-cAlâ’î, Amster­dam, 1985-86, and Alexander Jones, An Eleventh-Century Manual of Arabo-Byzantine Astron­omy, Amsterdam, 1987, in ISIS 82 (1991), pp. 116-118.

1992

  1. “Qibla charts, qibla maps, and related instruments” (with Richard Lorch), a chapter in J. B. Harley & David Woodward, eds., The History of Cartog­raphy, vol. 2, book 1: Cartography in the Tra­ditional Islamic and South Asian Societies, Chicago, Ill. & London: The University of Chicago Press, 1992, pp. 189-205. [See now no. 194$.]
  2. *  “Los cuadrantes solares andalusíes”, in Juan Vernet, Julio Samsó, et al., eds., El legado científico andalusí, Madrid: Minis­terio de Cul­tura, 1992, pp. 89-102.
  3. “[Andalusî astronomical instruments]”, in Jerrilynn D. Dodds, ed., Al-Anda­lusThe Art of Islamic Spain, New York: The Metro­politan Museum of Art, 1992, pp. 376-383.
  4. “Some remarks on Islamic astronomical instruments”, Scien­tiarum His­to­ria (Brussels) 18:1 (1992), pp. 5-23.
  5. “Astronomical instruments between East and West” [summary], Medium aevum quotidianum (Krems) 27 (1992), pp. 125-130. [See no. 148$ for the full version.]
  6. +  “Die Astrolabiensammlung des Germanischen National­muse­ums”, in Ger­hard Bott, ed., Focus Behaim-Globus, 2 vols., Nuremberg: Germa­nisches National­museum, 1992, I, pp. 101-114, and II, pp. 568-602, 640-643.
  7. +  “Weltkarten zur Ermittlung der Richtung nach Mekka”, ibid., I, pp. 167-171, and II, 686-691. [See now no. 194$.]
  8. “Some remarks on Islamic scientific manuscripts and instru­ments and past, present and future research”, in John Cooper, ed., The Sig­nificance of Islamic Manuscripts, London: Al-Furqan Islamic Heritage Foundation, 1992, pp. 115-144. [Arabic version on pp. 159-193 of the Arabic translation Aham­miyyat al-makhtûtât al-islâmiyya, published simultaneously.]
  9. “The ciphers of the monks and the astrolabe of Berselius recon­sidered”, in Sergei S. Demidov, Menso Folkerts, David A. Rowe & Christoph J. Scriba, eds., AmphoraFestschrift für Hans Wussing zum 65. Geburtstag, Basel, Bos­ton, Mass. & Berlin: Birkhäuser, 1992, pp. 375-388. [See now no. 203$.]

1993

  1. [C] Astronomy in the Service of Islam, Aldershot (U.K.): Vario­rum, 1993.

I          Science in the service of religion – the case of Islam (no. 117);
II          Some early Islamic tables for determining lunar crescent visibility (no. 81);
III         Ibn Yûnus on lunar crescent visibility (no. 98);
IV        Lunar crescent visibility predictions in medieval Islamic ephemerides (no. 114);
V         Mîkât: astronomical timekeeping (no. 112);
VI        Universal solutions in Islamic astronomy (no. 91);
VII       Universal solutions to problems of spherical astronomy from Mamluk Egypt and Syria (no. 96);
VIII      Mizwala: sundials (no. 119);
IX        Kibla: sacred direction (no. 39);
X         Makka: as the centre of the world (no. 93);
XI        Matlac: astronomical rising-po
kints (no. 102);
XII       On the orientation of the Kaaba (no. 51);
XIII      Astronomical alignments in medieval Islamic religious architecture (no. 53);
XIV      The earliest Islamic mathematical methods and tables for finding the direction of Mecca (no. 83);
Addenda; indexes

Click here for publisher's information and ordering possibilities.

            Reviews:

            Anonymous in Newsletter of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference Research Centre for Islamic History, Art, and Culture (Istanbul) 35 (Dec., 1994), p. 32.

            George Saliba in ISIS 86 (1995), pp. 97-98.

            Paul Kunitzsch in Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft 146 (1996), pp. 597-598.

            Raymond Mercier in Journal for the History of Astronomy 27 (1996), pp. 275-276.

  1. Islamic Mathematical Astronomy, 2nd revised edition, Alder­shot (U.K.): Variorum, 1993. [See no. 79$ for the 1st edn.]
  2. “1992 – A good year for medieval astronomical instruments”, Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society No. 36 (March, 1993), pp. 17-18.
  3. *  “L’astronomie en Syrie à l’époque islamique”, in Sophie Cluzan, Eric Delpont & Jeanne Mouliérac, eds., Syrie, Mémoire et Civili­sa­tion, Paris: Flam­marion (Institut du Monde Arabe), 1993, pp. 386-395, and [“Instruments astronomiques syriens”], pp. 432-443 and 480, and pp. 485-487 (bibliography (confused)). [An expanded English version of the descriptions of instruments is in SATMI, XIVb.]
  4. “Rewriting history through instruments: The secrets of a medieval astrolabe from Picardy”, in Robert G. Anderson, James A. Ben­nett & Will F. Ryan, eds., Making Instruments CountEssays on His­torical Scientific Instru­ments pre­sented to Gerard L’Estrange Turner, Aldershot (U.K.): Vario­rum, 1993, pp. 42-62. [Repr. in E-III; see now no. 203$.]
  5. “Some medieval astronomical instruments and their secrets”, in Renato Mazzolini, ed., Non-Verbal Sources in Science before 1900, Flo­rence: Leo S. Ol­schki, 1993, pp. 29-52.
  6. +  “Über historische Modelle des Universums in drei und in zwei Dimensionen – die Armillarsphäre und das Astrolab” and descrip­tions of one early printed work and one manuscript as well as of various instruments, in Uwe Müller, ed., 450 Jahre Copernicus ‘De revolutionibus’Astronomische und mathe­matische Bücher aus Schweinfurter Bibliotheken, Schweinfurt: Stadt­archiv (Veröf­fent­li­chung Nr. 9), 1993, pp. 123-137, then 167-169 (no. 20), 351-353 (no. 169), and 361-381 (nos. 177-181).
  7. +  “Die Geschichte der Naturwissenschaften: ein wahrhaft inter­disziplinäres Fach – Von Astrolabien bis zu Zahlensystemen, mit Exkursen in die Architek­tur, die Kunst, die Religion und die Volkskunde”. Text of a lecture delivered on the occasion of the cel­e­bration of the 50th anniversary of the Institut für Geschichte der Naturwissen–schaften, Frankfurt am Main, November, 1993, photocopied.

1994

  1. +  “Vergessene Schätze des Mittelalters – In Frankfurt erscheint der erste Katalog mittel­alterlicher astronomischer Instrumente”, Forschung Frankfurt (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Uni­versität, Frank­furt am Main), 11. Jahrgang (1993), Nr. 4, pp. 1-13. [Published in 1994.]
  2. “Mathematics applied to aspects of religious ritual in Islam”, in Ivor Grattan-Guinness, ed., Companion Encyclopae­dia of the History and Phi­losophy of the Mathe­matical Sciences, 2 vols., London: Rout­ledge & Kegan Paul, 1994, I, pp. 80-84.
  3. “The astrolabe dedicated to Cardinal Bessarion by Regio­montanus in 1462” (with Gerard L’E. Turner), in Gianfranco Fiaccadori, ed., Bessarione e l’Uma­ne­simo, Naples: Vivarium, 1994, pp. 340-367. [An early version of the next paper (prepared for the exhibition at the Biblioteca Nazionale Mar­ciana, Venice, during 27.4-31.5.1994), with many printing errors.]
  4. “The Astrolabe presented by Regiomontanus to Cardinal Bessar­ion in 1462” (with Gerard L’E. Turner), Nuncius: Annali di Storia della Scienza (Florence) 9:1 (1994), pp. 165-206. [Repr. in Gerard L’E. Turner, Renaissance Astrolabes and Their Makers, Aldershot (U.K.): Variorum, 2003, IV, and in E-XI.]
  5. +  “Astronomie im Dienste des Islam”, in Anton von Gotstedter, ed., Ad radicesFestband zum fünfzigjährigen Bestehen des Insti­tuts für Geschichte der Natur­wissenschaften Frankfurt am Main, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1994, pp. 99-124. [See no. 117$ for the original English text.]
  6. +  “Ein vergessenes Zahlensystem des mittelalterlichen Mönch­tums”, in Anton von Got­stedter, ed., Ad radicesFestband zum fünfzigjährigen Bestehen des Insti­tuts für Geschichte der Natur­wis­sen­schaften Frankfurt am Main, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1994, pp. 405-420. [See now no. 203$.]
  7. *  “Le plus vieil astrolabe d’Europe”, QantaraCultures en mouvement (Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris), No. 11 (April-June 1994), p. 51.
  8. “Poor judgement at Nuremberg”, Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society, No. 41 (June, 1994), p. 1. [Comments on the fact that the richest collection of historical scientific instruments in Germany was put back into storage after the 1992-93 exhibition "Focus Behaim Globus”. The collection was later displayed in an appropriate fashion.]
  9. “Folk astronomy in the service of religion: The case of Islam”, in Clive L. N. Ruggles & Nicholas J. Saunders, eds., Astrono­mies and Cultures, Niwot, Co.: University Press of Col­orado, 1993 [published 1994], pp. 124-138, with a summary in Clive L. N. Ruggles, ed., Archaeoastronomy in the 1990s, Lough­borough (U.K.): Group D Publications, Ltd., 1993, p. 346.
  10. “Astronomical instruments between East and West”, in Harry Küh­nel, ed., Kommunikation zwischen Orient und Okzident (Sitzungs­berichte der Österreichischen Akademie der Wis­sen­schaften, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, vol. 619, Veröf­fent­lichungen des Instituts für Realienkunde des Mittelalters und der frü­hen Neu­zeit, vol. 16), Vienna: Österreichische Akademie der Wis­sen­schaf­ten, 1994, pp. 143-198. [Repr. in E-I.]
  11. “Illustrations in Islamic scientific manuscripts”, in George N. Atiyeh, ed., The Book in the Islamic World: The Written Word and Communication in the Middle East, Albany, N.Y.: State Uni­versity of New York, & Wash­ington, D.C.: The Library of Congress, 1994, pp. 149-177. [Repr. in D-III.]
  12. “Rubc” [quadrant], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VIII, fascs. 139-140, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1994, pp. 574-575.
  13. “Ru’yat al-hilâl” [lunar crescent visibility], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VIII, fascs. 141-142, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1994, pp. 649-650.

1995

  1. “Applications of folk astronomy and mathematical astronomy to aspects of Muslim ritual”, The Arabist (Budapest Studies in Arabic), 13-14 (1995) (Alexander Fodor, ed., Proceedings of the XIVth UEAI Congress, Budapest, 1988, Part I), pp. 251-274.
  2. ++  “Himmel über Tanger”, in Hans Joachim Tischleder, ed., TangerFrankfurtZum Beispiel, Frankfurt am Main: Deutsch-Marokkanische Kul­tur­initiative, 1995, pp. 168-177.
  3. “Making instruments talk – Some medieval astronomical instruments and their secrets”, Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society, No. 44 (March, 1995), pp. 5-12.
  4. “Sâk” [leg in mathematics and astronomy], in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VIII, fascs. 143-144, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1995, p. 872.
  5. “The orientation of medieval Islamic religious architecture and cities”, Journal for the History of Astronomy 26 (1995), pp. 253-274. [A new version is in SATMI, VIIa.]
  6. “Samt” [direction, world-maps centred on Mecca], The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. VIII, fascs. 145-146, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1995. [See now no. 194$.]
  7. “Donald Routledge Hill (1922-1994)”, Arabic Science and Philosophy 5 (1995), pp. 297-302. [Obituary notice.]
  8. +  “Aspekte angewandter Wissenschaften in Moscheen und Klöstern”, Berichte zur Wissen­schafts­geschichte (Organ der Gesellschaft für Wis­sen­schafts­ge­schich­te) 18 (1995), pp. 85-95 and 137-149. [The English original is in SATMI, VIII.]
  9. “A forgotten Cistercian system of numerical notation”, CîteauxCommen­tarii Cistercienses 46:3-4 (1995), pp. 183-217. [See now no. 203$.]
  10. “Early Islamic astronomical instruments in Kuwaiti collections”, in Arlene Fullerton & Géza Fehérvári, eds., Kuwait: Art and ArchitectureA Collection of Essays, Kuwait (no publisher stated), 1995, pp. 76-96.
  11. Shafak” [twilight], in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. IX, fascs. 149-150, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1995, pp. 179-180.
  12. Islamic Astronomical Instruments, London: Variorum, 1987, reprinted Aldershot: Variorum, 1995. [See no. 87$.]
  13. *  “La scienza al servizio della religione: il caso dell’Islâm”, in Clelia Sarnelli Cerqua, Ornella Marra & Pier Giovanni Pelfer, eds., La civiltà islamica e le scienze, Atti del Simposio Internazionale, Firenze, Palazzo Panciatichi, 23 Novembre 1991, Florence: CUEN, 1995, pp. 129-150. [A translation of no. 117$.]
  14. A review of Tzvi Langermann, Ibn al-Haytham’s On the Configuration of the World, New York & London, 1990, in Journal of History of Astronomy 26 (1995), pp. 84-85.
  15. A review of Raymond d’Hollander, L’astrolabeles astrolabes du Musée Paul Dupuy, Toulouse: Le Musée Paul Dupuy & L’association française de topographie, 1993, in Annals of Science 52 (1995), pp. 531-533.
  16. A review of Daniel Martin Varisco, Medieval Agriculture and Islamic ScienceThe Almanac of a Yemeni Sultan, Seattle WA & London: University of Washington Press, 1994, in Yemeni Update, no. 36 (Winter/Spring 1995), pp. 36 and 45.

1996

  1. “Astronomy in Islamic society: Qibla, gnomonics and timekeeping”, in Rushdi Rashed, ed., in collaboration with Régis Morelon, Encyclopaedia of the History of Arabic Science, 3 vols., London & New York, N.Y.: Routledge, 1996, I, pp. 128-184. [Repr. in New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, IV; see no. 179$ for the French translation.]
  2. “On the role of the muezzin and the muwaqqit in medieval Islamic society”, in F. Jamil Ragep & Sally P. Ragep, with Steven J. Livesey, eds., Tradition, Transmission, Trans­formation: Proceedings of Two Conferences on Pre­modern Sci­ence Held at the University of Oklahoma, Leiden, New York, N.Y., & Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1996, pp. 285-346. [A new version is in SATMI, V.]
  3. “Islamic astronomy”, in Christopher Walker, ed., Astronomy before the Telescope, London: British Museum Press, 1996, pp. 143-174. [Repr. in D-I.]
  4. Shakkâziyya” [universal stereographic projections], in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. IX, fascs. 151-152, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1996, pp. 251-253.
  5. “The neglected astrolabe”, in Menso Folkerts, ed., Mathematische Probleme im Mittelalter Der lateinische und arabische Sprachbereich, (Wolfenbütteler Mittelalter-Studien, Band 10), Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, for the Herzog August-Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel, 1996, pp. 45-55.
  6. “The medieval Catalan astrolabe of the Society of Antiquaries, London” (with Kurt Maier), in Josep Casulleras & Julio Samsó, eds., From Baghdad to Barcelona. Studies in the Islamic Exact Sciences in Honour of Prof. Juan Vernet, (Anuari de Filologia (Universitat de Barcelona) XXX (1996) B-2), 2 vols., Barcelona: Instituto “Millás Vallicrosa” de Historia de la Ciencia Árabe, 1996, II, pp. 673-718. [Repr. in E-IV.]
  7. “The earliest European astrolabe in the light of other early astrolabes”, in Wesley Stevens, Guy Beaujouan & Anthony J. Turner, eds., The Old­est Latin Astro­labe, (PhysisRivista di sto­ria della scienza (Rome), Nuova serie 32:2-3 (1995) [published in September, 1996], pp. 189-450), pp. 359-404 (The remarks on pp. 384-385 beginning “An astrolabe from ca. 1300 … ” should be marked “Added in proof”.) [Repr. in E-II.]

1997

  1. “Der Frankfurter Katalog mittelalterlicher astronomischer Instru­mente”, in Gerhard Endress & Remke Kruk, eds., The Ancient Tradition in Christian and Islamic HellenismStudies on the Transmission of Greek Philosophy and Sciences dedicated to H. J. Drossaart Lulofs on his ninetieth birthday, [con­tains the Proceedings of the Third Symposium Graeco-Arabicum held at the Uni­ver­sity of Leiden on March 26-28, 1991, and additional contributions], Lei­den: Research School CNWS, School of Asian, African, and Amerindian Stu­dies, 1997, pp. 145-164.
  2. Articles in Helaine Selin, ed., Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures, Dordrecht: Kluwer Aca­demic Publishers, 1997, as follows: “Astronomical Instruments in the Islamic World” (pp. 86-88); “Astronomy in the Islamic World” (pp. 125-134); “Ibn al-Shâ­tir” (pp. 412-414); “Ibn Yûnus” (pp. 438-440); “al-Khalîlî” (pp. 477-478); “Maps and Map­making: Islamic World Maps Centered on Mecca” (pp. 577-578 and frontispiece); “al-Mâridînî, Jamâl al-Dîn and Badr al-Dîn” (pp. 601-602); and “Relig­ion and Science in Islam, I: Technical and Practical Aspects” (pp. 857-861).
  3. “Two Iranian world maps for finding the direction and distance to Mecca”, Imago MundiThe International Journal for the History of Cartography 49 (1997), pp. 62-82 and colour plate 1. [See now no. 194$.]
  4. +  “Astrolabe picard et numérotation cistercienne”, Musée des arts et métiers (Paris)La revue, Décembre 1997, pp. 47-55. [See now no. 203$.]
  5. *  “Astronomie et société musulmane : qibla, gnomonique, mîqât”, in Rushdi Rashed, ed., in collaboration with Régis Morelon, Histoire des sciences arabes, 3 vols., Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 1997, I, pp. 173-215. [See no. 169$ for the Eng­lish original.]

1998

  1. “Mamluk astronomy and the institution of the muwaqqit”, in Thomas Phillipp & Ulrich Haarmann, eds., The Mamluks in Egyptian Politics and Society, Cambridge, etc.: Cambridge University Press, 1998, pp. 153-162. [Repr. in D-IV.]
  2. “Astrolabe” in Robert Bud & Deborah Warner, eds., Instruments of Science: A Historical Encyclopedia, New York, N.Y.: Garland Publishing, 1998, pp. 32-34.
  3. *  “Les instruments scientifiques en terre d’Islam”, in Sophie Makariou, ed., L’apparence des cieuxAstronomie et astrologie en terre d’Islam, Paris: Édi­tions de la Réunion des musées nationaux, 1998, pp. 74-95. [Catalogue of an exhibi­tion held at the Musée du Louvre during 18.6.-21.9.1998.]
  4. “Tacdîl ... ” [three short articles on planetary equations, interpolation and the equation of time] in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. X, fascs. 165-166, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998, p. 55.
  5. “Takî al-Dîn” in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. X, fascs. 165-166, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998, pp. 132-133.
  6. “Tâsa” [magnetic compass] in The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new edition, vol. X, fascs. 167-168, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998, pp. 312-313.
  7. Editor: Donald R. Hill, Studies in Medieval Islamic TechnologyFrom Philo to al-JazariFrom Alexandria to Diyar Bakr, Alder­shot: Vario­rum, 1998.
  8. “Two Iranian world-maps for finding the direction and distance to Mecca”, in Z. Vesel, H. Beikbaghban and B. Thierry de Crussol des Epesse, eds., La science dans le monde iranien à l’époque islamique, Actes du colloque tenu à l’Université des Sciences Humaines de Strasbourg 6-8 juin 1995, (Bibliothèque iranienne 50), Tehran: Institut Français de Recherche en Iran, 1998, pp. 3-24. [See now no. 194$.]

1999

  1. “Islamische Weltkarten mit Mekka als Mittelpunkt – Die Wiederentdeckung einer bemerkenswerten Tradition mittelalterlicher Kartographie”, in Peter Eisenhardt, Frank Lin­hard and Kaisar Petanides, eds., Der Weg der WahrheitAufsätze zur Einheit der Wissen­schafts­geschichteFestgabe zum 60. Geburtstag von Walter G. Saltzer, Hildesheim: Olms, 1999, pp. 93-107. [See now no. 194$.]
  2. “The Toledo astrolabe”, Christie’s Magazine (London), April 1999, pp. 62-63. [See no. 215$ for a detailed study.]
  3. “The monumental Syrian astrolabe in the Maritime Museum, Istanbul”, Aydın Sayılı Özel Sayısı, I-III, a special issue of Erdem (Ankara: Atatürk Kültür Merkezi), in three parts (9:25-27), Ankara: Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 1996-1997, II, pp. 729-735 and 10 plates. [A contribution to a memorial volume for Professor Dr. Aydin Sayılı, first seen in 1999.] [Republished in SATMI, XIVc.]
  4. “Wine-gauging at Damme: The evidence of a late medieval manuscript” (co-author with Ad Meskens, Germain Bonte, Jacques de Groote and Mieke de Jonghe), Histoire et mesure (Paris: C.R.H.-C.N.R.S.) 14 (1999), pp. 51-77. [See also no. 203$.]
  5. “Bringing astronomical instruments back to earth: The geographical data on medieval astrolabes (to ca. 1100)”, in Arjo Vanderjagt & Lodi Nauta, eds., Between Demonstration and Imagination: Essays in the History of Science and Philosophy Presented to John D. North, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1999, pp. 3-53. [A new version is in SATMI, XVII.]
  6. “Time and space in Islam”, in Kristen Lippencott, ed., The Story of Time, London: Merrell Holberton Publishers, in association with the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, 1999, pp. 56-59.
  7. World-Maps for finding the direction and distance to Mecca: Innovation and tradition in Islamic science, Leiden: E. J. Brill, and London: Al-Furqan Islamic Heritage Foundation, 1999, xxix + 638 pp. [See no. 177$ for a summary, and SATMI, Xc for new information on the mathematics behind the grids on these maps.]

            Reviews:

            J. Lennart Berggren in Journal of the American Oriental Society 121:3 (2001), pp. 512-514.

            Charles Burnett in Annals of Science 59 (2002), pp. 328-329.

          Emilia Calvo in SuhaylInternational Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation (Barcelona) 1 (2000), pp. 363-366.

            Benno van Dalen in Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (London), Series 3, 12 (2002), pp. 371-373.

            Elly Dekker, “Cartographic Grids from Iran: An Early Version of the Retro-Azimuthal Orthographic Projection?”, The Cartographical Journal 37 (2000), pp. 109-116. [Dekker cannot accept that the ellipse segments representing the latitude curves on the grid are approximated by arcs of circles or that the inspiration for the grids is Islamic.]

            Owen J. Gingerich in History of Science 38 (2000), pp. 245-247. [Misunderstands the structure of the maps and the grids and proposes a construction for the grids that is invalid.]

            Jan Hogendijk in Historia Mathematica 30 (2003), pp. 85-87. [Mentions newly-discovered materials on the mathematics underlying the grids from early Islamic sources.]

            Muzaffar Iqbal in Islamic & Science 1:1 (2003), pp. 135-142. [A Muslim perspective on a Western “positivist” operation.]

            John D. North in Bibliotheca Orientalis (Leiden), 57 (2000), cols. 747-750. [Raises problems partly solved by the materials presented in SATMI, XIIa and XIIb (universal horary quadrant and universal horary dial) and VIIc (the mathematics underlying the grids on the Mecca-centred world-maps).]

            F. Jamil Ragep in Journal for the History of Astronomy 32:2 (2001), pp. 171-172. [Unfortunately mentions the procedure for constructing the grids proposed by Owen Gingerich without realizing that it is invalid.]

            Roser Puig in ISIS 92 (2001), pp. 360-362.

            George Saliba in Mathematical Reviews (2001) (accessible on the Internet under MathSciNet, No. 2001h:01008, pp. 1-5).

            Emilie Savage-Smith in Bulletin of the Scientific Instrument Society 66 (2000), pp. 32-35. [Much confused.]

            Roberto Tottoli in Quaderni di Studi Arabi 18 (2000), pp. 239-240.

  1. “Aspects of Fatimid astronomy: From hard-core mathematical astronomy to architectural orientations in Cairo”, in Marianne Barrucand, ed., L’Égypte Fatimide: son art et son histoireActes du colloque organisé à Paris les 28, 29 et 30 mai 1998, Paris: Presses de l’Université de Paris-Sorbonne, 1999, pp. 497-517. [Repr. in D-IV.]
  2. “On the history of astronomy in the medieval Maghrib”, in Études Philosophiques et Sociologiques Dédiées à Jamal ed-Dine Alaoui, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdallah, Publications de la Faculté des Lettres et des Sciences Hu­maines Dhar El Mahraz - Fès, No Spécial 14 (Département de Philosophie, Sociologie et Psychologie), Fez, 1998 [published 1999], pp. 27-61. [A revised and updated version of no. 105$ - see now D-VI.]

2000

  1. “Cataloguing medieval Islamic astronomical instruments”, an essay review of Francis Maddison and Emilie Savage-Smith, Science, Tools and Magic, vol. XII (in 2 parts) of The Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, general editor Julian Raby, The Nour Foundation, London, in association with Azimuth Editions and Oxford University Press, 1997, in Bibliotheca Orientalis (Leiden) 57 (2000), cols. 247-258.
  2. “The culmination of Islamic mathematical geography: World-maps for finding the direction and distance to Makkah”, Newsletter / Hadîth al-Dâr, Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah, Kuwait, 7 (1997) [published 2000], pp. 19-21 (English / Arabic). [See no. 194$.]
  3. “The star-names on three 14th-century astrolabes from Spain, France and Italy”, in Menso Folkerts and Richard P. Lorch, eds., Sic itur ad astra. Studien zur Geschichte der Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Festschrift für den Arabisten Paul Kunitzsch zum 70. Geburtstag, Wiesbaden: Otto Harrasso­witz, 2000, pp. 307-333. [Repr. in E-VII.]
  4. “Islamic world-maps centred on Mecca: The rediscovery of a remarkable tra­dition of medieval cartography”, in Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu and Feza Günergun, eds., Science in Islamic CivilisationProceedings of the International Sym­po­sia “Science Institutions in Islamic Civilisation” and “Science and Technology in the Turkish and Islamic World”, Istanbul: Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA), 2000, pp. 111-121. [See no. 194$.]
  5. “Too many cooks ... – A newly-rediscovered account of the first Islamic geodetic measure­ments”, SuhaylInternational Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation (Barcelona) 1 (2000), pp. 207-241. [Repr. in New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, IV, and D-X.]
  6. “Mathematical astronomy in Islamic civilisation”, in Helaine Selin, ed., Astronomy across Cul­tures: The History of Non-Western Astronomy, Dor­drecht, Boston & London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000, pp. 585-613.

2001

  1. The Ciphers of the MonksA Forgotten Number Notation of the Middle Ages, (BoethiusTexte und Abhandlungen zur Geschichte der Mathematik und der Naturwissenschaften, ed. Menso Folkerts, Band 44), Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2001, 506 pp. [See nos. 160$, 144$ and 178$ for summaries in English, German and French.]

            Reviews:

            Julio Samsó, in Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 2 (2001) pp. 409-411.

            Martin Hellmann, “Neue kurzschriftgeschichtliche Erkenntnisse im Zusammenhang mit den ‘griechischen’ und ‘chaldäischen’ Zahlzeichen”, published in Archiv für Stenographie, Text­verarbeitung, Bürotechnik (Forschungs- und Ausbildungsstätte für Kurz­schrift und Text­verarbeitung, Bayreuth), 2002, with a longer version at:

www.forschungsstaette.de/Rezensionen/King_2001.htm.

            [Contains important reflections on the connection between the ciphers as they appear in England in the 13th century and the “Acropolis” shorthand notation from 4th-century-B.C. Athens.]

            Eberhard Knobloch, in Mathematical Reviews 2002, (accessible on the Internet under MathSciNet, No. 2002k:01013). [Announcement only.]

            Jens Hoyrup in Centaurus 42 (2000), pp. 246-247.

            Catherine Eagleton in British Journal for the History of Science, 38 (2005), pp. 138-139.

         Alain Boureau, in Histoire et mesure 18 (2006), with several errors of fact and interpretation.

  1. “Astronomical handbooks and tables from the Islamic world (750-1900): An interim report” (co-author with Julio Samsó, with a contribution from Bernard R. Goldstein), SuhaylInternational Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation (Barcelona) 2 (2001), pp. 9-105. [A shorter illustrated version is in no. 208$.]
  2. “The astrolabe depicted in the intarsia of the Studiolo of Archduke Federico in Urbino”, in La scienza del Ducato di Urbino – The Science of the Dukedom of Urbino, Flavio Vetrano, ed., Urbino: Accademia Raffaello, 2001, pp. 101-139. [The original version is now in E-X.]
  3. A review of Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, ed., Osmanlı astronomi literatürü tarihi (History of Astronomy Literature during the Ottoman Period), 2 vols., and Osmanlı matematik literatürü tarihi (History of Mathematics Literature during the Ottoman Period), 2 vols., (IRCICA Studies and Sources on the History of Science, nos. 7-8), Istanbul: Islâm Tarih, Sanat ve Kültür Arastırma Merkezi (IRCICA), 1996 and 1999, in ISIS 92:2 (2001), pp. 357-359.

2002

  1. A website featuring the table of contents of the Frankfurt catalogue of medieval instruments, listing these chronologically according to region:
  1. Article “Zîdj” [= astronomical handbooks and tables] in The Encyclopedia of Islam, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2002, vol. XI, fasc. 187, pp. 496-508. [Illustrated; a longer version is in no. 204$.]
  2. *  “Weltkarten zum Auffinden der Richtung und Entfernung nach Mekka”, Spektrum Iran (Kulturabteilung der Botschaft der Islamischen Republik Iran, Berlin) 15:1 (2002), pp. 5-10. [See no. 194$.]
  3. “A vetustissimus Arabic text on the quadrans vetus”, Journal for the History of Astronomy 33 (2002), pp. 237-255. [Repr. in E-VIII; see also SATMI, IXa.]
  4. “Medieval monastic ciphers in Renaissance printed texts”, in Verfasser und Herausgeber mathematischer Texte der frühen Neuzeit, Rainer Gebhardt, ed., Annaberg-Buchholz: Adam-Ries-Bund (Schriften, Band 14), 2002, pp. 51-62.
  5. “A recently discovered sixteenth-century Spanish astrolabe” (by Roberto Moreno, with David A. King and Koenraad Van Cleempoel), Annals of Science 59 (2002), pp. 331-362. [In the published version, all three contributors are listed as co-authors.]
  6. “Notes on Yemeni astronomy in the Rasulid period”, an essay review of Daniel Martin Varisco and G. Rex Smith, eds., The Manuscript of al-Malik al-Afdal al-cAbbâs b. cAlî b. Dâ’ûd b. Yûsuf b. cUmar b. cAlî ibn Rasûl (d. 778/1377) – A Medieval Arabic Anthology from the Yemen, [London?]: E. J. W. Gibb Memorial Trust, 1998, in Yemen Update 44 (2002), accessible at:
    www.aiys.org/webdate/kngrev.html.

2003

  1. “The Renaissance of astronomy in Baghdad in the ninth and tenth centuries – A list of publications, mainly from the past 50 years”, website at:
  1. “An astrolabe from 14th-century Christian Spain with inscriptions in Latin, Hebrew and Arabic – A unique testimonial to an intercultural encounter”, SuhaylInternational Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation (Barcelona) 3 (2002/03), pp. 9-156. [A new version is in SATMI, XV.]
  2. +  “Ein vergessenes Zahlensystem des mittelalterlichen Mönchtums”, in Jahresbericht des Physikalischen Vereins Frankfurt am Main – 1994, 170. Vereinsjahr, Frankfurt, 2003 [!], pp. 47-62. [Reprinted from no. 144$CR.]
  3. *  “L’astronomia al servizio dell’Islam / Astronomie im Dienste des Islam”, in Nel segno di Aldebaran / Im Zeichen von Aldebaran – L’Islam e la Scienza / Islam und Wissenschaft, Bolzano, 2003, pp. 12-19. [Catalogue of an exhibition in the Centro Culturale Trevi, Bolzano, during 8.-28.03.2003.]
  4. *  “Zur Geschichte des Astrolabiums in der Welt des Islam”, in Das Astrolabium: Beobachtungs- und Rechengerät freisichtiger Himmelskunde, Hermann Mucke, ed., Vienna: Österreichischer Astronomischer Verein (Internationale Fachabende), 2003, pp. 79-88.
  5. A review of Gerald L’E. Turner, Elizabethan Instrument Makers: The Origins of the London Trade in Precision Instrument Making, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000, in Journal of the History of Collections (Oxford) 15:1 (2003), pp. 147-150.
  6. “A remarkable Italian astrolabe from ca. 1300 – Witness to an ingenious Islamic tradition of non-standard astrolabes”, in MUSA MUSAEI: Studies on Scientific Instruments and Collections in Honour of Mara Miniati, Marco Beretta, Paolo Galluzzi and Carlo Triarico, eds., Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2003, pp. 29-52. [Repr. in E-V; a new version is in SATMI, XIIId.]
  7. “14th-century England or 9th-century Baghdad? New insights on the origins of the elusive astronomical instrument called the Navicula de Venetiis”, in Astronomy and Astrology from the Babylonians to Kepler – Essays Presented to Bernard R. Goldstein on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday, Peter Barker, Alan C. Bowen, José Chabás, Gad Freudenthal and Y. Tzvi Langermann, eds., 2 pts., Centaurus 45 (2003) and 46 (2004), I, pp. 204-226. [Repr. in E-IX; see also SATMI, XIIb.]
  8. “Astronomy in the service of Islam”, in Cosmology through Time: Ancient and Modern Cosmologies in the Mediterranean Area - Conference Proceedings, Astronomical Observatory of Rome, Monteporzio Catone, June 17-20, 2001, Sergio Colafrancesco and Giuliana Giobbi, eds., Milan: Mimesis, 2003, pp. 143-152.
  9. “The cult of St. Wilgefortis in Flanders, Holland, England and France”, in Am Kreuz – Eine Frau: Anfänge – Abhängigkeiten – Aktualisierungen, Sigrid Glockzin-Bever and Martin Kraatz, eds., in Ästhetik – Theologie – Liturgik (Münster: LIT Verlag), 26 (2003), pp. 55-97. [A revised version with many more illustrations is available: see X4.]

2004

  1. “A Hellenistic astrological table deemed worthy of being penned in gold ink: The Arabic tradition of Vettius Valens’ auxiliary function for finding the length of life”, in Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences in Honour of David Pingree, Charles Burnett, Jan P. Hogendijk, Kim Plofker and Michio Yano, eds., Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2004, pp. 666-714. [Repr. in D-VII.]
  2. *  “Astrolabis de la Catalunya medieval”, in La ciència en la història dels Països Catalans, I: Dels àrabs al Renaixement, Barcelona: Institut d’Estudis Catalans, 2004, pp. 161-204.
  3. “Reflections on some new studies on applied science in Islamic societies (8th-19th centuries)”, Islam & Science 2:1 (2004), pp. 43-56. [Available on the Internet at www.highbeam.com (enter title at their site); repr. in New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, III.]
  4. “Towards a history from Antiquity to the Renaissance of sundials and other instruments for reckoning time by the sun and stars”, an essay review of Hester Higton, ed., Sundials at Greenwich – A Catalogue of the Sundials, Nocturnals, and Horary Quadrants in the National Maritime Museum, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002, and eadem, Sundials – An Illustrated History of Portable Dials, London: Philip Wilson, 2001, Annals of Science 61:3 (2004), pp. 377-389. [Available at:          http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/articlecollections/annalsofscience/documents/scientific_instruments.pdf.]
  5. “From inscriptions to context: Some Islamic astronomical instruments and their secrets”, in Text & Context in Islamic Societies, Irene A. Bierman, ed., Reading (U.K.): Ithaca, 2004, pp. 87-130. [Repr. in D-II.]
  6. “Islamic astronomical instruments and some newly-discovered examples of transmission to Europe”, in Mediterranean. Splendour of the Medieval Mediterranean. 13th-15th Centuries, Elisenda Guedea, ed., Barcelona: Institut Europeu de la Mediterrània (IeMed) & Lunwerg Editores, 2004, pp. 400-423 and 606-607 (bibliography).
  7. [SATMI-1] In Synchrony with the Heavens – Studies in Astronomical Timekeeping and Instrumentation in Islamic Civilization, vol. 1: The Call of the Muezzin. Studies I-IX, (Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science – Texts and Studies, vol. LV:1), Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2004, lvii + 930 pp. Contains:

I           A survey of tables for timekeeping by the sun and stars (previously unpublished);
II          A survey of tables for regulating the times of prayer (previously unpublished);
III         A survey of arithmetical shadow-schemes for time-reckoning (see no. 109);
IV        On the times of prayer in Islam (previously unpublished);
V         On the role of the muezzin and the muwaqqit in medieval Islamic societies (no. 169);
VIa      Universal solutions in Islamic astronomy (see no. 91);
VIb      Universal solutions from Mamluk Syria and Egypt (see no. 96);
VIIa     On the orientation of medieval Islamic architecture and cities (see no. 156);
VIIb     Architecture and astronomy: The ventilators of medieval Cairo and their secrets (see no. 68);
VIIc     Safavid world-maps centred on Mecca (supplement to no. 194);
VIII      Aspects of practical astronomy in mosques and monasteries (see no. 159);
IX        When the night sky over Qandahar was lit only by stars ... ... (previously unpublished).

Reviews:
Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, in Archeoastronomy: The Journal of Astronomy in Culture 19 (2005), p. 103.
Benno van Dalen in Abstracta Iranica 29 (2006).
Charles Burnett in The Medieval Review (2005).
Muzaffar Iqbal, in Islam & Science 4:1 (2006), pp. 79-83.
George Saliba, an essay review “Islamic astronomy at its best” in Journal for the History of Astronomy 37 (2006), pp. 233-238.
Mercè Comes in Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 8 (2008), pp. 278-280.

2005

  1. [SATMI-2] In Synchrony with the Heavens – Studies in Astronomical Timekeeping and Instrumentation in Islamic Civilization, vol. 2: Instruments of Mass Calculation. Studies X-XVIII, (Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science – Texts and Studies, vol. LV:2), Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2005, lxxvi + 1066 pp. Contains:

X         Astronomical instrumentation in the Islamic world (previously unpublished);
XI        An approximate formula for timekeeping (750-1900) (previously unpublished);
XIIa     On the universal horary quadrant for timekeeping by the sun (previously unpublished);
XIIb     On universal horary dials for timekeeping by the sun and stars (previously unpublished);
XIIIa    The neglected astrolabe – A supplement to the standard literature on the favourite astronomical instrument of the Middle Ages (previously unpublished);
XIIIb    The oldest astrolabe in the world, from 8th-century Baghdad (previously unpublished);
XIIIc    Astrolabes from late-9th- and 10th-century Baghdad (previously unpublished);
XIIId    A medieval Italian testimonial to a forgotten Islamic tradition of non-standard astrolabes (no. 220);
XIIIe    The origin of the astrolabe according to medieval Islamic sources (see no. 48);
XIVa    An astrolabe made by the Yemeni Sultan al-Ashraf (see no. 73);
XIVb    Some astronomical instruments from medieval Syria (see no. 134);
XIVc    A monumental astrolabe from 13th-century Damascus (see no. 190);
XIVd    An astrolabe for the Sultan Ulugh Beg (previously unpublished);
XIVe    Two astrolabes for the Ottoman Sultan Bayazid II (see no. 236);
XIVf     Brief remarks on astronomical instruments from Muslim India (previously unpublished);
XIVg    A universal astrolabe from 17th-century Lahore (previously unpublished);
XV       An astrolabe from medieval Spain with inscriptions in Hebrew, Arabic and Latin (see no. 215);
XVI      The geographical data on early medieval Islamic instruments (see no. 192);
XVII     The quatrefoil as decoration on astrolabe retes (previously unpublished);
XVIII    A checklist of Islamic astronomical instruments to ca. 1500, ordered chronologically by region (previously unpublished)

Reviews:
Benno van Dalen in Abstracta Iranica 29 (2006).
George Saliba, an essay review “Islamic astronomy at its best” in Journal for the History of Astronomy 37 (2006), pp. 233-238.
Muzaffar Iqbal, in Islam & Science 4:1 (2006), pp. 79-83.
Mercè Comes in Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 8 (2008), pp. 278-280.

  1. “The sacred geography of Islam”, in Mathematics and the Divine – A Historical Study, T. Koetsier and L. Bergmans, eds., Dordrecht: Elsevier, 2005, pp. 161-178. [Repr. in D-VIII.]
  2. a  “Astronomie und Mathematik als Gottesdienst: Das Beispiel Islam”, in Jochen Brüning and Eberhard Knobloch, eds., Die mathematischen Wurzeln der Kultur – Mathematische Innovationen und ihre kulturellen Folgen, Munich: Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2005, pp. 91-123. [Translation not seen by the author before publication.]
  1. b  Article “Kibla” for Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 4. Auflage, Tübingen: RGG4.

2006

  1. “An introduction to Ioannes Regiomontanus’ acrostic, Cardinal Basileios “Ioannes” Bessarion’s agenda, and Piero Della Francesca’s enigma” (based on two remarkable discoveries by Berthold Holzschuh), Preprints of the Institute for the History of Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, 4th series, no. 2 (2006), ca. 50 pp. – available at http://www.davidaking.org/Code.htm.
  2. “Astrolabes and angels, epigrams and enigmas:~ Regiomontanus, Cardinal Bessarion and Piero della Francesca conveniunt in unum” (based on two remarkable discoveries by Berthold Holzschuh), Preprints of the Institute for the History of Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, 4th series, no. 1 (2006), ca. 300 pp.
  3. “Two astrolabes for the Ottoman Sultan Bayezit II”, in Essays in Honour of Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, 2 vols., Istanbul: Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA), 2006, I, pp. 439-459. [A new version is in SATMI, XIVe.]

2007

  1. Article “Astrolabes, quadrants and computing devices”, in The Encyclopedia of Islam, 3rd edn., Leiden: Brill.
  2. Astrolabes and Angels, Epigrams and Enigmas – From Regiomontanus’ Acrostic for Cardinal Bessarion to Piero della Francesca’s Flagellation of Christ – An essay inspired by two remarkable discoveries by Berthold Holzschuh, (Boethius – Texte und Abhandlungen zur Geschichte der Mathematik und der Naturwissenschaften, Band 56, Menso Folkerts, ed.), Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2007, pp. xi+348 pp. with CD-ROM.

Reviews:

Marco Böhlandt in ISIS 100 (2009), pp. 903-904.

Uta Lindgren in Sudhoffs Archiv 93:1 (2009), pp. 119-120.

Arianna Borrelli in NTM – Berichte zur Wissesnschaftsgeschichte 32:1 (2009), pp. 109-110.

Emmanuel Poulle* in Archives internationales d’histoire des sciences 59 (2009), pp. 366-369.
Peter Schreiner* in Byzantinische Zeitschrift 102 (2009), pp. 246-247.

Michael H. Shank* in Journal for the History of Astronomy 42 (2011), pp. 391-403.

[* None of these scholars accepts that the dedication on Regiomontanus’ astrolabe is an acrostic or that there is any connection between the dedication and Piero’s painting.]

  1. “On the history of astronomy in the medieval Maghrib”, in Études d’histoire des sciences arabes, Mohammed Abattouy, ed., Series “Hiwar al-Dhiffatayn // Les deux rives”, Casablanca: Fondation du Roi Abdul Aziz Al Saoud pour les Etudes islamiques et les Sciences humaines, 2007, pp. 175-218. [A new version of nos. 105 and 196; repr. in D-VI.]
  2. “A world-map in the tradition of al-Bîrûnî (ca. 1040) and al-Khâzinî (ca. 1120) presented by Sirâj al-Dîn al-Sajâwandî (1210)”, Mélanges offerts à Hossam Elkhadem par ses amis et ses élèves, ed. Frank Daelemans, Jean-Marie Duvosquel, Robert Halleux & David Juste, Archives et bibliothèques de Belgique // Archief- en bibliotheek­wezen in België, Numéro spécial // Extranummer 83, Brussels, 2007, pp. 131-160. [Repr. in D-XI.]
  3. Articles “Ibn Yûnus”, “Ibn al-Shâtir”, “al-Khalîlî”, “Abu ‘l-cUqûl”, and “Hasan Husayn and Muhammad Husayn”, in Thomas A. Hockey, ed., Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers, 2 vols., Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2007.
  4. Benno van Dalen, with an introduction by DAK, “An index of authors for the Survey of Cairo Scientific Manuscripts”, Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 7 (2007), pp. 9-46. [See no. 78 for the original publication.]
  5. “Henry C. King (1915-2005)”, an obituary in Journal for the History of Astronomy 38:1 (2007), pp. 526-527.
  6. “Asger Aaboe (1922-2007)”, an obituary in ISIS 98 (2007), pp. 796-798.

2008

  1. “Mathematical geography in 15th-century Egypt – An episode in the decline of Islamic science”, Islamic Thought in the Middle Ages – Studies in Text, Transmission and Translation, in Honour of Hans Daiber, ed. Anna Akasoy & Wim Raven, (Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, ed. Hans Daiber, vol. LXXV), Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2008, pp. 319-344. [Repr. in D-XII.]
  2. “An astrolabe from Einbeck datable ca. 1330”, Mathematics Celestial and Terrestrial – Festschrift für Menso Folkerts zum 65. Geburtstag, ed. Joseph Dauben, Stefan Kirschner, Andreas Kühne, Paul Kunitzsch & Richard P. Lorch, Acta Historica Leopoldina, Nummer 54, Halle (Saale): Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina, 2008, pp. 161-178. [Repr. in E-VI.]
  3. “An instrument of mass calculation made by Nastûlus in Baghdad ca. 900”, Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 8 (2008), pp. 93-119, repr, in New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science, III.
  4. “Islamic astronomical instruments and some examples of transmission to Europe”, in Emilia Calvo, Mercè Comes, Roser Puig and Mònica Rius, eds., A Shared Legacy – Islamic Science East and West – Homage to Professor J. Millàs Vallicrosa, Barcelona: Universitat de Barcelona, Publicacions i edicions, 2008, pp. 321-361.

2009

  1. Article “Badîc al-Asturlâbî”, in Encyclopaedia of Islam, 3rd edn.
  2. “The geometry of Piero’s Flagellation of Christ and the geometry of the epigram on the astrolabe of Regiomontanus that inspired it”, in Rocco Sinisgalli, ed., L’arte della matematica nella prospettiva, Foligno (PG): C. B. Cartei & Bianchi Editore, 2009, pp. 189-191 and 407-412 (illustrations).

2010

  1. “Edward Stewart Kennedy, (1912-2009)”, an obituary in Journal for the History of Astronomy 41 (2010), pp. 117-119.
  2. “Astronomical instruments”, in Handbook of Medieval Studies, Albrecht Classen, ed., Berlin and New York: De Gruyter, 2010, pp. 126-130.
  3. Contributions to biographical notes on E. S. Kennedy and a complete bibliography of his works (the last with Benno van Dalen), in Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation 9 (2009/10), pp. 185-214.
  4. “An illustration of the Caliph al-Hâkim together with his astronomer/astrologer Ibn Yûnus”, in Ismaili and Fatimid Studies in Honor of Paul E. Walker, Bruce D. Craig, ed., Chicago: University of Chicago, Center for Middle East Studies, 2010, pp. 151-159.

2011

  1. [E] Astrolabes from Medieval Europe, Aldershot & Burlington VT: Ashgate - Variorum, 2011.

Contents:

I           Astronomical instruments between East and West (no. 148)
II          The earliest European astrolabe in the light of other early astrolabes (no. 174)
III         Rewriting history through instruments: The secrets of a medieval astrolabe from Picardy (no. 135)
IV        The medieval Catalan astrolabe of the Society of Antiquaries, London (no. 173)
V         A remarkable Italian astrolabe from ca. 1300 – Witness to an ingenious Islamic tradition of non-standard astrolabes (no. 220)
VI        An astrolabe from Einbeck datable ca. 1330 (no. 246)
VII       The star-names on three 14th-century astrolabes from Spain, France and Italy (no. 199)
VIII      A vetustissimus Arabic text on the quadrans vetus (no. 210)
IX        14th-century England or 9th-century Baghdad? New insights on the origins of the elusive astronomical instrument called the Navicula de Venetiis (no. 221)

X         The astrolabe depicted in the intarsia of the Studiolo of Archduke Federico in Urbino (no. 205)
XI        The astrolabe presented by Regiomontanus to Cardinal Bessarion in 1462 (no. 142)
XII       An ordered list of European astrolabes up to ca. 1500 (previously unpublished)

Click here for publisher's information and ordering possibilities.

  1. A review of Julio Samsó, Astronomy and Astrology in al-Andalus and the Maghrib, Aldershot: Ashgate-Variorum, 2007, and idem, Astro­meteoro­logía y astrología medievales, Barcelona, 2008, in Journal of Islamic Studies (Oxford), 2011, doi: 10.1093/jis/etr068. [First title suppressed by publisher in review.]
  2. A review of Catherine Eagleton, Monks, Manuscripts and Sundials – The Navicula in Medieval England, Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2010, to appear in Speculum – A Journal of Medieval Studies in October, 2011. [Illustration removed by reviews editor!]
  3. The invention of algebra in Zabid: Between legend and fact”, to appear in Islamic Philosophy, Science, Culture, and Religion: Studies in Honor of Dimitri Gutas, Felicitas Opwis, ed., David Reisman and Felicitas Opwis, eds., Leiden: Brill, 2011, pp. 223-231.

 

WORKS IN PRESS

X1     “From a heavenly Arabic poem to an enigmatic Judaeo-Arabic astrolabe” (with Mohamed Abu Zayed and Petra Schmidl), to appear in Suhayl – International Journal for the History of the Exact and Natural Sciences in Islamic Civilisation.

X2     “The two traditions of sacred geography in medieval Islamic texts and their influence on the orientation of Islamic religious architecture”, prepared for The World of Islamic Art – Papers Presented to Ernst Grube, edited by Doris Abouseif and Dalu Jones.

X3       “An Ottoman astrolabe full of surprises”, to appear in a Festschrift for J. Lennart Berggren, edited by Nathan Sidoli and Glen Van Brummelen.

X4       “The woman on the cross: the bearded virgin St. Wilgefortis”. [A revised version of no. 223 with more illustrations; a French translation by Jeremy Nicklin is available.]

X5       [D] Islamic Astronomy and Geography, Aldershot & Burlington VT: Ashgate - Variorum, to appear in 2012.

Contents:

I           Islamic astronomy (no. 170)
II          From inscriptions to context: Some Islamic astronomical instruments and their secrets (no. 228)
III         Illustrations in Islamic scientific manuscripts (no. 149)

IV        Aspects of Fatimid astronomy: From hard-core mathematical astronomy to architectural orientations in Cairo (no. 195)
V         Mamluk astronomy and the institution of the muwaqqit (no. 180)
VI        On the history of astronomy in the medieval Maghrib (see no. 239)
VII       A Hellenistic astrological table deemed worthy of being penned in gold ink: The Arabic tradition of Vettius Valens’ auxiliary function for finding the length of life (no. 224, newly formatted)
VIII      The sacred geography of Islam (no. 238)
IX        Al-Bazdawî and the qibla in early Islamic Transoxania (no. 65)
X         Too many cooks ... – A newly-rediscovered account of the first Islamic geodetic measurements (no. 201)
XI        A world-map in the tradition of al-Bîrûnî (ca. 1040) and al-Khâzinî (ca. 1120) presented by Sirâj al-Dîn al-Sajâwandî (1210) (no. 240)
XII       Mathematical geography in 15th-century Egypt – An episode in the decline of Islamic science (no. 245, newly formatted)

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